Organic strawberries could be the source of an epidemic of hepatitis A in the United States and Canada

Health authorities have identified at least 17 cases of hepatitis A that were allegedly caused by the consumption of organic strawberries sold in supermarkets.

Since the beginning of April, several cases ofhepatitis A unexplained appeared to UNITED STATES and at Canada. In total, there would be approximately 17 people concerned.

But recently, epidemiological data have revealed that organic strawberries would most certainly be the cause of the contamination.

Relatively serious infections

L’hepatitis A is an acute infectious disease of liver, which can cause severe symptoms in infected patients. It is usually manifested by abdominal pain, nausea, jaundice and high fever. The symptoms usually last less than 2 months.

The US Food and Drug Administration is investigating a potential link between a hepatitis A outbreak and fresh organic strawberries.https://t.co/NfGg1snNr3

— CNN (@CNN) May 30, 2022

On the 17 cases listed in the United States and Canada, a dozen patients had to be hospitalized because of a worrying state of health.

Organic strawberries would be responsible

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the hepatitis A epidemic could be due to organic strawberries brands FreshKampo and HEBsold in supermarkets.

A investigation of the FDA is underway to determine with certainty the origin of these cases of hepatitis A.

Recommendations from health authorities

The health authorities Americans and Canadians advise people who still have strawberries of these brands to to throw.

In addition, the FDA recommends that anyone not vaccinated against hepatitis A, who may have eaten these strawberries, see a doctor as quickly as possible.

The FDA, along with CDC, Canadian, state, and local partners are investigating a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A in the US & Canada potentially linked to fresh organic strawberries branded as FreshKampo & HEB, purchased between March 5 & April 25. https:/ /t.co/7eCsxY5A pic.twitter.com/prtfw9UWQB

— US FDA (@US_FDA) May 28, 2022

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