How long have you been a big tech customer? – Datanews on PC

Trying out Twitter for the very first time: here I am, my very first tweet devoid of the slightest interest. Dated October 22, 2012. Exactly 5 months after creating my first Twitter account. No idea why I waited so long anyway. But I’m ‘celebrating’ my 15th Twitter anniversary. Exactly two days after celebrating my 45th birthday. I have therefore already been active on Twitter for a third of my life. With certainly many messages without much meaning, but in general also technological innovations that I had heard and that I wanted to share since it is still and always in my opinion the main reason for which you follow me.

Technology isn’t forever, but your accounts will never go away.

No technology lasts forever, but this 15th candle on Twitter got me thinking about how other big tech accounts work. Facebook? I only created an account there in 2008, which is a small eternity in the meantime. Google? Pretty much the same answer. I’ve had a Google Account since July 2007, as my queries in the settings menus tell me. In contrast, I’ve been using Gmail since its inception in 2004, the foundation of what would later become Google Account. Apple? If I remember correctly, I changed accounts quite a bit. My current account dates back to 2003 and was mainly used for my purchases on iTunes. And occasionally even today for iPad apps. Microsoft? It’s the only account in the lot that I can’t even find any trace of. Why not ask the helpdesk, suggest me the online ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ (FAQ). ‘August 30, 2001’ is Support Advisor Sarita’s answer to the question how long have I had a Microsoft account. Sarita actually wondered why anyone wanted to know such a thing. My Microsoft account was opened automatically when creating a Hotmail address. See, at the end of this summer, I will have been a Microsoft customer for 21 years. No technology is forever, but these big tech accounts are clearly resisting.

And suddenly, the idea came to me that I still had a very old account. Or not? The ICQ ‘chat’ app – pronounced ‘I Seek You’ – was sort of the ancestor of instant messaging in 1996. At its peak in 2001, ICQ had more than 100 million users. And in between, I opened my first account and was totally enamored with the idea of ​​chatting through a Windows client. It was sort of the reinvention of the telephone for me. The fact that I still know my 7-digit UIN – Unified Identification Number – code by heart is the best proof of this. Finally, ICQ was replaced in no time among the majority of Belgians by MSN Messenger: thanks to the dominance of the Windows platform and MSN/Hotmail accounts which facilitated the transition to MSN Messenger.

As we are in 2022 and as many takeovers later ICQ clearly still exists, although I don’t know anyone who still uses it. But with my UIN code created 24 years ago (and maybe even 25 years! ), I can still connect, as I have seen. No technology is forever, but accounts will obviously never go away.

Trying out Twitter for the very first time: here I am, my very first uninteresting tweet. Dated October 22, 2012. Exactly 5 months after creating my first Twitter account. No idea why I waited so long anyway. But I’m ‘celebrating’ my 15th Twitter anniversary. Exactly two days after celebrating my 45th birthday. I have therefore already been active on Twitter for a third of my life. With certainly many messages without much meaning, but in general also technological innovations that I had heard and that I wanted to share since it is still and always in my opinion the main reason for which you follow me. No technology lasts forever, but this 15th candle on Twitter got me thinking about how other big tech accounts work. Facebook? I only created an account there in 2008, which is a small eternity in the meantime. Google? Pretty much the same answer. I’ve had a Google Account since July 2007, as my queries in the settings menus tell me. In contrast, I’ve been using Gmail since its inception in 2004, the foundation of what would later become Google Account. Apple? If I remember correctly, I changed accounts quite a bit. My current account dates back to 2003 and was mainly used for my purchases on iTunes. And occasionally even today for iPad apps. Microsoft? It’s the only account in the lot that I can’t even find any trace of. Why not ask the helpdesk, suggest me the online ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ (FAQ). ‘August 30, 2001’ is Support Advisor Sarita’s answer to the question how long have I had a Microsoft account. Sarita actually wondered why anyone wanted to know such a thing. My Microsoft account was opened automatically when creating a Hotmail address. See, at the end of this summer, I will have been a Microsoft customer for 21 years. No technology is forever, but these big tech accounts are clearly resisting. And suddenly, the idea came to me that I still had a very old account. Or not? The ICQ ‘chat’ app – pronounced ‘I Seek You’ – was sort of the ancestor of instant messaging in 1996. At its peak in 2001, ICQ had more than 100 million users. And in between, I opened my first account and was totally enamored with the idea of ​​chatting through a Windows client. It was sort of the reinvention of the telephone for me. The fact that I still know my 7-digit UIN – Unified Identification Number – code by heart is the best proof of this. Finally, ICQ was replaced in no time among the majority of Belgians by MSN Messenger: thanks to the dominance of the Windows platform and MSN/Hotmail accounts which facilitated the transition to MSN Messenger. As we are in 2022 and as many takeovers later ICQ clearly still exists, although I don’t know anyone who still uses it. But with my UIN code created 24 years ago (and maybe even 25 years! ), I can still connect, as I have seen. No technology is forever, but accounts will obviously never go away.

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